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BABYLINK
SAFETY AROUND THE HOME

BabyLink.com offers a wide variety of products for the home that will help you create a safe environment for your baby as your baby grows and begins to explore their expanded environment around your home. We have listed below some suggestions to help you create this safe environment allowing you peace of mind while giving your baby a safe and nurturing home as they become more mobile as they grow.

Kitchen Safety

  • When cooking use only the rear burners and turn pot handles to the back; keeping hot foods and liquids away from your child’s reach.
  • Keep children away from the front of the oven when it is on.
  • All step stools and chairs should be kept away from counters and the stove.
  • Keep knives, scissors, and other sharp objects in child proof drawers and cupboards; out of reach of the exploring baby.
  • Make use of knob covers and a stove shield which prevents your child from turning the oven on.
  • Make sure refrigerator magnets that are small enough to choke a child are not with in reach of little hands.
  • Have a working fire extinguisher within the kitchen area and know how to use it.
  • Attach heavy furniture such as bookshelves and hutches to the wall with brackets to make sure your climbing toddler can not pull the furniture over on themselves.

Furniture Safety

  • Make sue that TV’s, electronics, lamps, and other decorative objects throughout your home are secured so that they cannot tip over.
  • Attach heavy furniture such as bookshelves, entertainment centers, flat screen TV’s, and hutches to the wall with brackets to make sure your climbing toddler can not pull the furniture over on themselves.
  • Cover sharp edges and corners on furniture such as coffee tables and end tables.
  • Make sure that your home and furniture is not painted with lead paint.
  • Keep up on recalled baby furniture and other items specifically purchased for your baby; especially used items. Make sure you contact the manufacturer to see that any used item still meets the safety standards recommended by the manufacturer. Be sure to get manufacturers instructions for that item.
  • Use a high chair that meets the recommended safety requirements for sturdiness, stability, locking tray and safety belt with a crotch strap. Never leave infants and toddlers unsupervised in high chairs. The high chair restraint straps should always be used to restrain the child while using the high chair. The high chair tray is not designed to restrain the child. The weight limit on high chairs is 50 pounds.
  • Make sure that your crib and playpen are in good condition and that they meet recommended safety standards. The bars should be no more than 2 3/8 inches apart and the mattresses should fit securely against the side. Bumper pads and very soft bedding are not recommended because of suffocation danger. Make sure that your baby sleeps on their back.
  • Use baskets or boxes without lids to store toys.
  • Keep dangling draperies or shade cords up and well out of reach.

Around the House Safety

  • Place a soft surface, such as a rug or pad, beneath the crib. That way, if baby does learn how to climb out, bruised knees will be kept to a minimum. And toys thrown overboard won’t break as easily.
  • Baby now loves to open and close doors. Watch out for fingers!
  • Gate all staircases.
  • Make sure windows and screens are secured with stops and locks.
  • Keep baby close to you when an unknown animal approaches. Toddlers are very erratic and may upset even the most placid of dogs.

 

  • Bathroom Safety: Always stay within arm’s reach when bathing your baby. Bath tub rings can slip and tip over. There should always be an adult watching the baby in the tub. Young children should not be left in charge of a baby in a bathtub.
  • Young children can drown in as little as one inch of water.
  • Keep toilet lids shut and use toilet locks if you have an infant or toddler in the house.
  • Poisons and Cleaners: Empty out buckets as soon as you are done with your chores. When taking a break, put the bucket where your child cannot reach it. Store empty buckets upside down
  • Move all cleaning products to a high, out of reach cabinet (latches aren’t enough).
  • Get rid of insect traps, repellents, and poisons on the floor.

 

Important References

 

BABYLINK
SUMMERTIME SAFETY

 

Pool Safety

  • Always appoint an “Adult Pool Watcher” while outside by the pool. It is easy to become distracted and miss a moment’s glance where a child could suddenly be in danger. An adult should always be within an arm’s length of toddlers or infants.
  • Pools should be maintained on a regular basis with clear water and working pool lights.
  • Keep fencing within the guidelines of the law for pool safety. Have all four sides of the pool fenced off and make sure all gate locks are safe and in working order.
  • Keep all toys away from the pool. A child would be inclined to reach for a toy in or near the water not realizing the danger.
  • Always keep a cordless phone along with emergency phone numbers nearby when outside by the pool area.
  • At a very early age in infancy, teach your baby to float. Learn infant and adult CPR. This could save the life of a child in trouble. Classes are offered by the Red Cross and several EMS locations.
  • Teach children to call 911 in case there is an emergency.
  • Always have toddlers wear life jackets that fit snugly. Floaties and water wings are not safe enough on their own for children in the water.
  • Keep a shepherd’s hook and flotation ring near by to use if someone in the water is in trouble.
  • Keep fencing within the guidelines of the law for pool safety. Have all four sides of the pool fenced off and make sure all gate locks are safe and in working order.

Sun Safety
The American Cancer Society suggests the following guidelines to protect children from the sun:

  • S- Shadow test. If the shadow is shorter than the child, the sun is at its strongest and most dangerous point.
  • U- Ultraviolet sun block with an SPF of 15 or greater should always be used if the child is exposed to sun. . This means you are protected from a reaction to the sun’s rays 15 times longer than without the sunscreen. Read the label, and know when to reapply
  • N- Now! Protect children from the harmful effects of the sun now.
  • Sunscreens cannot take the place of protective clothing and should be used together for the best protection.
  • Sunscreen is recommended for all children over 6 months of age. A blistering sunburn before the age of 10 will double the likelihood of that child developing skin cancer sometime during their lifetime.
  • Try to keep your children out of the sun between the hours of 10 a.m. and 3 p.m., when the sun’s ultraviolet rays are the strongest.
  • Know the ways of the rays! Your children can get a sun burn on a cloudy day just as easily as on a sunny day.
  • The sun’s rays can penetrate through three feet of water. The sun will also reflect off the water and the sand. A beach umbrella is great but may not provide all the protection needed.
  • Babies are the most susceptible because their skin is thinnest. Some antibiotics and other medications can also make the skin more sensitive to the sun.
  • Play in the shade as much as possible. This is especially important for babies under 6 months of age; keep them under the shade of a porch, tree, umbrella, or stroller.
  • Have children wear hats. Hats with brims that shade the face and flaps that shade the neck are best. Sunglasses with UV protection can help protect a child’s eyes.

 

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